Headlines

Code of Conduct

Fostering a Sense of Community

A positive learning environment is created by all members of the school community treating each other with “Respect, Cooperation, and Courtesy”. Students are to be treated with respect and dignity.  In return, they must demonstrate respect for themselves, for others and for the responsibilities of citizenship through acceptable behaviour.  

Respect and responsibility are demonstrated when a student:
• comes to school; attends all classes on time,  prepared to work, and ready to learn;
• refrains from bringing anything to school that may compromise the safety of others;
• follows the established rules and takes responsibility for his or her own actions and shows respect for themselves and for others.

Responsible Citzenship
All school members must:
• demonstrate honesty and integrity and respect the rights of others;
• be respectful of others with regards to comments and refrain from using offensive language;
• respect and treat others fairly, with dignity and respect, regardless of their race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability;
• show proper care and regard for school property and the property of others;
• respect persons who are in a position of authority;
• respect the need of others to work in an environment of learning & teaching;
• behave in a manner which will bring credit to the school when participating on field trips or excursions to other schools or institutions for academic or sports activities.

Respect for Authority
• Students are expected to comply with the rules of the school and the requests made by all members of the staff, teachers, educational assistants, office staff, custodians, cafeteria staff and bus drivers.  Failure to comply with the rules of the school will be viewed as “opposition to authority” and will result in consequences ranging from counselling to suspension.  

Respect for Self    
• Students are expected to come to school free from the influence of alcohol or drugs. Their use on school property, during school excursions, at school dances or at school related activities is strictly forbidden.  There is a suspension from school for the use of alcohol, drugs or other illegal substances.

Student Council

We have a large, and dynamic Student Council at Bayside Secondary. Council members, including two Student Senators, attend an annual off-site Leadership Day in each semester. Throughout the year, Student Council works with other school clubs, councils and teams to give students a voice at Bayside. The Council runs many exciting events including Dances, Spirit events, the Reindeer Hunt, a Holiday Extravaganza, our End-of-Year BBQ, guest speakers, and fundraisers. Student Council offers Spirit Wear to students and the school community and keeps the school informed by running morning announcements. 

Activities for this year include:

  • Dances and Semi-formals
  • Spirit Days and Fundraisers
  • BSS Spirit wear
  • Floats in our local community Santa Claus Parades
  • The highly anticipated annual running of the BSS Reindeer Hunt in December
  • Holiday Extravaganza and Winter Carnival Talent Shows
  • Election campaign in May
  • Year-end Barbeque in June

History at Bayside


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CHC 2D or CHC 2DF • Canadian History in the Twentieth Century, Grade 10, Academic
This course explores the local, national, and global forces that have shaped Canada’s national identity from World War I to the present. Students will investigate the challenges presented by economic, social, and technological changes and explore the contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian culture and society during this period. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to evaluate various interpretations of the issues and events of the period and to present their own points of view.

CHC 2P • Canadian History in the Twentieth Century, Grade 10, Applied
This course explores some of the pivotal events and experiences that have influenced the development of Canada’s identity as a nation from World War I to the present. By examining how the country has responded to economic, social, and technological changes and how individuals and groups have contributed to Canadian culture and society during this period, students will develop their ability to make connections between historical and current events. Students will have opportunities to formulate questions, locate information, develop informed opinions, and present ideas about the central issues and events of the period.

CHC 2L • Canadian History in the Twentieth Century, Grade 10, Essential
This course focuses on the connections between the student and key people, events and themes in Canadian contemporary studies. Students prepare for Grade 11 Canadian and World Studies Workplace Preparation courses through the development and extension of historical literacy skills and critical thinking skills. Students explore a variety of topics highlighting individuals and events that have contributed to the story of Canada. The major themes of Canadian identity, internal and external relationships and changes since 1914, are explored through guided investigation. Students have the opportunity to extend analytical skills with a focus on identifying and interpreting events and perspectives and making connections. Students practise reading, visual, and oral literacy skills to identify and communicate ideas in a variety of media.

CHV 2O5 or CHV 205F • Civics, Grade 10, Open, Half Credit
This course explores what it means to be an informed, participating citizen in a democratic society. Students will learn about the elements of democracy in local, national, and global contexts, about political reactions to social change, and about political decision-making processes in Canada. They will explore their own and others’ ideas about civics questions and learn how to think critically about public issues and react responsibly to them.

CHW 3M or CHW 3MF • World History to the Sixteenth Century, Grade 11, University/College Preparation
This course investigates the history of humanity from earliest times to the sixteenth century.Students will analyse diverse societies from around the world, with an emphasis on the political, cultural, and economic structures and historical forces that have shaped the modern world.They will apply historical inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to evaluate the influence of selected individuals, groups, and innovations and to present their own conclusions.
Prerequisite: CHC 2D or CHC 2P

CHY 4U or CHY 4UP • World History: The West and the World, Grade 12, University Preparation
This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization and world history from the sixteenth century to the present. Students will learn about the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world and about the development of modern social, political, and economic systems. They will use critical-thinking and communication skills to investigate the historical roots of contemporary issues and present their conclusions.
Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities

Note: The AP WORLD HISTORY (CHY 4UAP) is spread over two years. The first half is in grade eleven, CHW 3M, and the second half, CHY 4U, is in grade twelve. The AP exam would be written in May of the student’s grade twelve year.

Law at Bayside


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CLU 3M • Understanding Canadian Law, Grade 11, University/College Preparation
This course explores Canadian law with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to people’s everyday lives. Students will investigate fundamental legal concepts and processes to gain a practical understanding of Canada’s legal system, including the criminal justice system. Students will use critical-thinking, inquiry, and communication skills to develop informed opinions on legal issues and apply this knowledge in a variety of ways and settings, including case analysis, legal research projects, mock trials, and debates.
Prerequisite: CHC 2D or CHC 2P

CLU 3E • Understanding Canadian Law, Grade 11, Workplace Preparation
This course gives students practical information about legal issues that directly affect their lives.Students will examine the need for laws in society, the roots of Canada’s legal system, the rights and freedoms that people in Canada enjoy, and the basic elements of criminal law and dispute resolution. Through experiences such as mock trials, debates, and case studies, students will apply inquiry and communication skills to develop and express opinions on legal topics of interest to them.
Prerequisite: CHC 2D, CHC 2P or CHC 2L

CLN 4U • Canadian and International Law, Grade 12, University Prep aration
This course examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political, and global contexts. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law and the principles and practices of international law and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian society and the wider world. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyse legal issues, conduct independent research, and present the results of their inquiries in a variety of ways.
Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities

CLN 4U/PAF 4O• Canadian and International Law, Grade 12,
University Preparation, (Part of 2 credit Law & Security package)

This course examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political, and global contexts. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law and the principles and practices of international law and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian society and the wider world. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyse legal issues, conduct independent research, and present the results of their inquiries in a variety of ways. This course is paired with PAF 40.This two credit course is aimed at those who may be interested in pursuing careers in the law and security field.
Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities

CIE 3M Economics University/College Preparation
This course examines the changing Canadian economy and helps students develop an understanding of their own role as economic agents. Students will apply economic models and concepts to assess the roles of the various stakeholders in the Canadian economy and analyse the interactions among them. Students will consider the economic behaviour of the individual as consumer, contributor, and citizen in a mixed economy and will apply economic inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to make and defend informed economic decisions.

Philosophy at Bayside

The Philosophy Course

The philosophy course at Bayside combines innovative projects with a solid academic foundation for students wishing to pursue studies in history, ethics, law, the arts, politics or the social sciences.   Here is an overview of subjects, discussion topics and assignments in our Philosophy classroom:

Ethics - why don't we always tell the truth?
Metaphysics - does God exist?  do we share a common reality? what is existence?
Epistemology - how do we learn? is knowledge ever certain?
Aesthetics - what makes art, "art"?  what is beautiful? what is the purpose of art?
Logic - how do we make our assumptions valid? how do we argue a side we don't necessarily agree with?
Socio-Political - who makes the best leader? how should we be governed?

Here are a few magazine assignments submitted by former students:


Søren Kierkegaard John Locke  
Noam Chomsky